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About 30/30/30

Matt Cutts got me into this: doing something for 30 days. That's every day, the same thing, for 30 days. You can read his ideas here on TED.

In the past I've given up alcohol for 30 days and swam in the sea every day for 30 days. No big deals, I know. But why? Because I am a hopeless self-disciplinarian and an astonishing procrastinator. Because I like to challenge and watch myself. Making a habit of something for 30 days tends to make me more aware of myself, my thoughts, behaviour and actions, and it generally produces some good writing too. It's as if consciously doing one thing regularly allows creativity to flourish.

Today I started 30/30/30:
30 days
30 walks around our 20 acre apple orchard, Aldon Manor, near Offham in Kent, UK
30 draft haibun or haiku written in direct or indirect response

I'm going to keep a record of the haibun and haiku on the 30/30/30 page so I can easily read through the month's work and find them for future editing. And it's a good time to be writing about the orchard on this first day of spring. March and April see bare wood transformed into a world of green, the first push of apple blossom.

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spring foghorn . . . 
cormorants spilling 
from an over-crowded ledge  

Paul Miller, Called Home (2006)


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